Client Story: Random House / BBC Books / Frozen Planet

With the exciting BBC Frozen Planet series due to be aired on TV this month I’m pleased to reveal my work on the accompanying book of the series.

I was asked to prepare all the images for the book. I worked closely with the designer supplying colour managed and exactingly sharpened CMYK images from supplied RGB originals.

The most important part of the work was to ensure tonal and colour consistency between series of shots. As often happens sequences were filmed with multiple cameras and bringing together their disparate shots can reveal quite major exposure differences that spoil the consistency of the scenes portrayed, it was my job to provide a better visual match whilst retaining accuracy and the integrity of the shots. Such as sequence in the book is in chapter 5 covering the hunting of bison by wolves.

There was a variety of sources for the images from high quality RAW files to HD screen grabs that needed careful interpolation and sharpening to work on the printed page.

In TV and Film production the process of colour balancing images in sequence is called “grading”, what I offered was the stills equivalent and was very pleased to receive an email from the authors Alastair Fothergill and Vanessa Berlowitz thanking me for doing the work. This meant a lot to me as is so often the case I found myself immersed in the subject matter and wanted to get the best possible results.

If you have an important book project and want the very best results from the images then please feel free to contact me, its not a costly process given the difference that good grading and preparation can make.

The Frozen Planet book is now available and can be purchased on-line, here is Amazons page of the book:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Frozen-Planet-Alastair-Fothergill/dp/1846079624/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1319471881&sr=8-3

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BBC pays Getty for photo of own building

Whilst sending a tea boy out to take a snap doesn’t sound particularly right (do tea boys exist?) it does show how the large libraries have successfully setup the mindset of picture buyers.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/06/29/bbc_snap/

Of course its not quite as simple as this, the BBC could well have a fixed deal where they pay a set fee to Getty and so sending someone outside would just add to costs, are you old enough to remember when things were a bit more simple?

Stephen

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