“Wacom One” graphics tablet

Wacom One tablet attached to my Macbook Pro laptop via USB. Im using it to brush back highlight detail with the adjustment brush in Lightroom. Image on screen © Sue Flood. www.sueflood.com, used with permission.

Had a fun time running some Professional Imaging Workflow workshops at Chester Zoo recently. Part of the course involved me doing some live image grading as I described my techniques for processing images in Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop.

I normally use a larger A4 size tablet back in the office but this portable Wacom tablet is very good and I had no problem brushing on the images and controlling the interface on a huge monitor at the front of the class.

I find physical buttons/sliders on Wacom tablets to be a bit of a pain and dont use them so this paired back “minimal” tablet is ideal, it is pressure sensitive and it has a  26cm x 17cm  usable surface area. Highly recommended. I paid £66 for mine but its currently on offer at Amazon (affiliate link below)

The reason I use a pen and tablet like this is that it allows me to better control my brush in much the same way that a pen is easier to write a signature than it is to write it with a mouse or tracker pad, there is a learning curve to use it – but the results are worthwhile in terms of control and productivity.

Don’t buy this if you are happy to use your mouse or tracker pad or if you don’t have access to a screen calibrator – sort that first

Affiliate link:

Get your own Wacom One, click here

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Getting View: Print Size to work properly in Photoshop

 

I love using “Print Size” in the Photoshop “View” menu as it allows me to see how big the image will print in the physical (real) world.

The chances are that if you try this with an image in your Photoshop the result will be incorrect (for instance a 10″ image may be nearer 7″ on screen). The reason for this is that by default Photoshop assumes you are using an early Apple monitor that has a resolution of 72dpi. In actual fact most modern monitors display many more dots per inch (pixels per inch) hence making the print preview too small. To make an accurate sized print preview you need to enter the actual dpi for your particular monitor.

Read moreGetting View: Print Size to work properly in Photoshop

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Print size calculator 1

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Print size calculator 2

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